Surviving the terror of the organ-harvesting trade

An Eritrean refugee living in Melbourne gives horrific details of human traffickers and organ harvesters in the Sinai.

An Eritrean refugee living in Melbourne has given horrific details of human traffickers and organ harvesters he says held him captive for months in Egypt.

The man, kidnapped in Sudan and taken to Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula, says he feared he would die as Bedouin tribesmen demanded either a ransom or one of his kidneys.

He is one of a small number of survivors in Australia of what has become a notorious trade in people and their organs in the lawless Sinai.

 

Beyene Weldegiorgis has the details.

 

Samson Habtemariam was 26 years old when he fled Eritrea, hiding in a truck.

He had been imprisoned for more than a year, then held under house arrest, accused of cooperating with opposition forces.

But after crossing the border, he was caught by Sudanese security forces, who sold him as a prisoner to a tribe of Bedouin called the Rashaida.

Samson Habtemariam eventually found himself in the Sinai Desert in neighbouring Egypt, along with other victims of a human-trafficking and organ-harvesting operation.

He has told SBS Radio’s Tigrinya program tribal leaders ordered them to pay a ransom of more than 30-thousand dollars or they would lose their kidneys.

(Tigrinya, then translated:) ”They told us that they would sell one kidney for $25,000 and two of our kidneys for $50,000. Then all of us decided to die, as there was not any way to save our lives. Some three or four people were dying every day. We were blindfolded, we couldn’t see each other, and, therefore, we could not discuss anything. You could not know who is dying or alive. Because there was a guard for 24 hours, we could not discuss anything.”

 

He says he and the others were held in a house where kidneys were removed.

(Tigrinya, then translated:) ”The house was full of human bodies. If you pick anything from the ground, you find human hairs, bones. These bodies were the people who died after their kidneys have been taken. After the operation, they dump the body in that house. There were bodies that were thrown outside as well.”

Samson Habtemariam says he was imprisoned for six months, with his family unable to raise the ransom.

 

Then one night, he and others in the camp staged a mass breakout.

(Tigrinya, then translated:) ”Thirty-five of us were tied. If one of your hands is free, the other one is tied with another leg. You cannot run, but we ran by rolling on the ground. Then, they started to shoot at us. From the 35 people, most of them were killed. Two of them entered Israel on the same night. Nine of us were hiding in bushes. In total, 11 people escaped.”

 

He says he initially found refuge in a mosque.

 

He then travelled to Cairo, before being resettled in Australia by the United Nations relief agency, the UNHCR.

The director of Human Rights Concern Eritrea, Elsa Chyrum, says Mr Habtemariam’s case is definitely not an isolated one.

”Many like him who fled persecution in their own country were kidnapped at the Eritrean and Sudanese border and sold and resold by traffickers to the highest bidders and, from there, taken to the Sinai Desert. There, they were subjected to torture, rape, chained and beaten, and also demanded to pay ransoms up to $45,000 per person. We have interviewed many people who were asked to pay between $30,000 and $45,000. So for the traffickers, it becomes an income-generating business.”

 

Sister Azezet Kidane, also known as Sister Aziza, is an Eritrean-born Catholic nun who works as a volunteer with Physicians for Human Rights Israel.

She has interviewed well over a thousand refugees who have suffered kidnapping, torture, rape and forced labour while passing through the Sinai.

 

She recently spoke at a conference in the Vatican.

”I met people burned with melted plastics. I have met people burned with kerosene. I have met people with deep wounds with chains. I met people who became blinded because, for six months, eight months, they were blindfolded, and, when they take them out to the sun, they lose their sight. The worst is when their mind and soul is wounded.”

Various international organisations, including the United Nations, have reported thousands of refugees fall victim to people traffickers and organ harvesters in the Sinai.

Ethiopia’s honorary consul to Australia, Graham Romans, cites a recent report to the European Commission finding up to 30,000 people trafficked over five years.

 

He says most were from Eritrea.

”Most of those who are trafficked have died in captivity, even after ransoms have been paid. It’s estimated that some 600 million US dollars has been paid out in ransoms, and the report suggests that many Eritreans do not survive the trafficking and torture. And (it’s) calculated between five (thousand) and 10,000 hostages have died or been killed in captivity, with children as young as two or three years (old) among the victims.”

 

Samson Habtemariam says he believes most of the people who detained him in the Sinai were Egyptian.

(Tigrinya, then translated:) ”They were Egyptians — they spoke Arabic — but I can say there were Israelis as well. There were times to see special soldiers who spoke good English. Though they didn’t speak much in front of us, sometimes they came and asked us when are we going to pay the money. But the guards were Egyptians and Palestinians.”

 

He also believes those removing the organs had medical training.

(Tigrinya, then translated:) ”They let the victim lay on a bed. The operators wear appropriate medical dress. They use anaesthesia. After they take the kidney from your body, they send it directly … Sorry, I don’t want to talk about this ⦠(starts to cry …) But as we have heard, they send the kidney to the neighbouring countries. It won’t go back to Egypt. Special cars come to the place. They use instruments just like what they use in hospitals. Those people are experts, they are doctors.”

 

Saleh Johar is an Eritrean activist who has written a book about Eritrean victims of the people smugglers.

He believes the organs are placed in cooled containers and taken by road to Cairo, or across the border into Israel, then flown to countries where recipients are waiting.

”The kidney cannot stay for more than 48 hours. So to transport it to Europe, Australia or America, you need airplanes. The closest airports are in Israel and Egypt. From this argument, if one wants to transport a kidney, it should be through Egypt or Israel.”

Egypt is a major destination and transit country for asylum seekers.

At the beginning of this year, the country held about a quarter of a million people from Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Iraq.

 

(Transcript from World News Radio)

 

 

 

Eritrean currency fights back dictatorship



Eritrean currency fights back dictatorship



(Asmara 27/08/2014) Freedom Friday (Arbi Harnet) activists have successfully launched an innovative project to encourage young Eritreans to resist the regime that is pushing them into exile. The initiative which was successfully launched at the annual festival held in Asmara (expo) aims to spread the message by writing anti dictatorship and motivational slogans on currency notes (the Eritrean nakafa). The initiative named Nakfa Talks (“Nakfa Tezaribu”), has so far released 5,000 Nakfa worth of bank notes.



The regime is said to have taken note of the initiative and has started following some trails of inquiry but so far with little success. In their latest communication members of the Project Team inside Eritrea stated that they are all in good spirit and getting ready for their next project which they hope to launch shortly.



It is to be remembered that, last week, Freedom Friday made thousands of calls encouraging parents to not send their children back to the indefinite national service training center following the summer break for those who completed (graduate of the 27th round) their six months mandatory training.



Organizers of Freedom Friday wish to encourage all Eritreans to support this latest initiative by asking their friends and family to participate in resistance inside Eritrea by writing messages of defiance and solidarity on bank notes and putting them into circulation. Thanking all those who have been supporting the initiative project coordinators are also calling on all Eritreans to support upcoming projects by making a small contribution to Freedom Friday.



End
Notes
Freedom Friday is a movement aimed at encouraging resistance to dictatorship inside Eritrea by developing innovative projects that encourage collective actions of defiance and linking these with the resistance in the diaspora.



For further information please contact the project on ArbiHarnet@gmail.com

ዜና ዓርቢ ሓርነት – ናቕፋ ተዛሪቡ

ዜና ዓርቢ ሓርነት – ናቕፋ ተዛሪቡ

ኣብ ውሽጢ ኤርትራ ዝርከቡ ኣባላት ዓርቢ ሓርነት ህዝቢ ኣንጽር ምልኪ ሓቢሩ ንኽልዓል ዝጽውዕ ጭርሖ ዝተጻሕፎ ሓሙሽተ ሽሕ ናቕፋ ኣብ ኣስመራ ዘርጊሖም። ዝበዝሐ ክፋል ናይዚ ገንዘብ ኣብቲ ዝሓለፈ ሰንበት ኣብ ኤክስፖ ኣስመራ ዝተዛዘመ ፈስቲቫል ኤርትራ ዝተዘርግሐ ክኸውን ከሎ፡ ገለ‘ውን በተን ኣብ ውሽጢ ከተማ ኣስመራ ዝርከባ ዝተፈላለያ ናይ ንግዲ ትካላት ኣቢሉ ኣብ ዕዳጋ ይዘውር ከም ዘሎ ነቲ ስራሕ ዝፈጸሙ ኣባላት ዓርቢ ሓርነት ካብ ኣስመራ ሓቢሮም።

እቲ ዝተዘርገሐ ገንዘብ “ስደት መፍትሒ ድዩ፧ ተላዓል!” ዝብል ሓረግ ዝተጻሕፎ እዩ። ቀንዲ ዕላማ ናይዚ ሓረግ እቲ ህልዊ ኩነታት ሃገርና ጸንኪርዎ እግሩ ናብ ዝመርሖ ካብ ሃገሩ ዝስደድ ዘሎ መንእሰይ ኮይኑ፡ ዘይሕጋዊ ስደት ናብ ሞትን ህልቂትን ዘምርሕ ድኣ እምበር ፍታሕ ዘምጽእ ከምዘይኮነ ብምዝኽኻር፡ ኤርትራዊ መንእሰይ ነዚ ስርዓት መኪቱ ሓርነቱ ኣብ ምውሓስ መሪሕ ተራ ንኽጻወት ዝተባብዕ እዩ። በዚ ዝተኻየደ ናይ “ናቕፋ ተዛሪቡ” ዝብል ካምፐይን ዝተረበሸ ጉጅለ ህግደፍ ብፍርሕን ራዕድን ተዋሓጡ ከምዘሎ ከኣ እቲ ዝበጽሓና ሓበሬታ የረድእ። ነዚ ኣብነታዊ ፍጻሜ ዘካየዱ ኣባላት ዓርቢ ሓርነት ከም ወትሩ ሞራሎም ሓፍ ብምባል ንኻልእ ስራሕ ይዳለዉ ከም ዘለዉ ከኣ እቲ ካብ ኣስመራ ዝመጸና ሓበሬታ ወሲኹ የረድእ። በዚ ኣጋጣሚ ዓርቢ ሓርነት ንኹሎም ንለውጢ ዝንቀሳቐሱ ኣብ ውሽጢ ሃገር ዝርከቡ ተባዓት ኤርትራውያን ነዚ ሓሳብ ብምድጋፍ ብብወገኖም “ስደት መፍትሒ ድዩ፧ ተላዓል !” ዝብል ጽሑፍ ኣብ ናቕፋ እንዳጸሓፉ ከዙሩ ትጽውዕ።

ካልእ ምስዚ ኣብዚ ዝተኣሳሰረ ዜና፡ ዓርቢ ሓርነት ዝሓለፈ ሰሙን ወለዲ ነቶም ካብ ሳዋ ተመሊሶም ኣብ ገዝኦም ዝርከቡ ኣባላት 27 ዙርያ ዝኾኑ ደቆም ናብ ሳዋ ንኸይመልስዎም ዝጽውዕ “ድቅኻ ኣበይ ኣለው”  ዝተስምየ ናይ ቴለፎን መልእክቲ ናብ ኤርትራ ኣማሓላሊፋ ከም ዝነበርት ዝዝከር እዩ። ቀንዲ ዛዕባ ናይቲ መልእኽቲ ከኣ ወለዲ ነቶም ድሮ “ደቅና ናብ ሳዋ ደጊምና ኣይንሰድድን” ብምባል እምቢትኦም ዘስምዑ ዘለዎ ወለዲ ብምድጋፍ ዝተረፉ ወለዲዊን ኣብ ጎድኖም ደው ክብሉን ንውልዶም ንኸይሰዱን ዝጽውዕ እዩ ነይሩ።

ፕሮጀክት ዓርቢ ሓርነት ንኹሎም ብገንዘብን ብምኽርን ዝድግፍዋ ኤርትራውያንን ፈተውቲ ኤርትራን እንዳ ሞጎሰት፡ ደግፎኩምን ምኽርኹምን ከይፍለያ በዚ ኣጋጣሚ ደጊማ ተዘኻኽር።

26 ነሓሰ 2014
ፕሮጀክት ዓርቢ ሓርነት

 

Eritrean currency fights back dictatorship



(Asmara 27/08/2014) Freedom Friday (Arbi Harnet) activists have successfully launched an innovative project to encourage young Eritreans to resist the regime that is pushing them into exile. The initiative which was successfully launched at the annual festival held in Asmara (expo) aims to spread the message by writing anti dictatorship and motivational slogans on currency notes (the Eritrean nakafa). The initiative named Nakfa Talks (“Nakfa Tezaribu”), has so far released 5,000 Nakfa worth of bank notes.



The regime is said to have taken note of the initiative and has started following some trails of inquiry but so far with little success. In their latest communication members of the Project Team inside Eritrea stated that they are all in good spirit and getting ready for their next project which they hope to launch shortly.



It is to be remembered that, last week, Freedom Friday made thousands of calls encouraging parents to not send their children back to the indefinite national service training center following the summer break for those who completed (graduate of the 27th round) their six months mandatory training.



Organizers of Freedom Friday wish to encourage all Eritreans to support this latest initiative by asking their friends and family to participate in resistance inside Eritrea by writing messages of defiance and solidarity on bank notes and putting them into circulation. Thanking all those who have been supporting the initiative project coordinators are also calling on all Eritreans to support upcoming projects by making a small contribution to Freedom Friday.



End
Notes
Freedom Friday is a movement aimed at encouraging resistance to dictatorship inside Eritrea by developing innovative projects that encourage collective actions of defiance and linking these with the resistance in the diaspora.



For further information please contact the project on ArbiHarnet@gmail.com